Fixing variances in general and subsidiary ledgers – Accounting NOT for Dummies

There can be many causes for a subsidiary ledger to go out of balance with the general ledger.  An invoice could have been posted in an incorrect amount, a general journal entry could have been made to correct the general ledger, or a payment could have been posted using a journal entry rather than using the payables or receivables “modules.”

One example from my world of public accounting involves corrections made by the CPA firm at year end which also affect subsidiary ledgers.  For example, as part of year-end tax closing the CPA firm makes an adjustment to accounts payable to correct the balance to the actual payables at year end, which for whatever reason were misstated.  Let’s say the adjustment is a debit of $1,000 to an A/P account, which brings the balance to the new corrected amount of $9,000.  Prior to the adjustment, the subsidiary ledger shows a balance of $10,000.  In this example, we’ll say that the adjustment relates to only one vendor – ABC Corp. – and that it relates to a mis-posted invoice for COGS.

When the journal entry is posted to the general ledger, here is what happens, using T accounts, where the left side of the “T” is a debit, and the right side a credit:

A/P                                                              COGS                                             ABC Corp A/P sub

$1,0000 |   $10,000                           $10,000 | $1,000                                     | $10,000

Above, you can see that the journal entry has corrected the general ledger, but the subsidiary ledger is now out of balance to the general ledger.

I have developed a procedure, using a “dummy cash account” to fix the problem and bring the accounts back into balance.  First, set up a new cash account and call it “dummy cash” or something similar so that everyone knows it’s not a real account.  Then open vendor payables and select ABC Corp.  Now, make a $1,000 payment to ABC Corp using the dummy cash account, not your real bank account.

Here is what has happened:

A/P                                        COGS                             ABC Corp A/P sub   Dummy Cash

$1,0000 |   $10,000     $10,000| $1,000       $1,000 | $10,000              |$1,000

$1,000|

Now, you can see that Accounts Payable is understated by $1,000 and the dummy cash account has a credit of $1,000.  So, you must make one more journal entry to correct both of these accounts, making a credit to A/P and a debit to dummy cash.

A/P                                         COGS                                ABC Corp A/P sub   Dummy Cash

$1,0000 |   $10,000      $10,000| $1,000     $1,000 | $10,000  $1,000|$1,000

$1,000    |   $1,000

                                                                                                                                                                 

              | $9,000        $9,000|                              |$9,000                   -0-

As you can see, now all is right with the world.  The accounts payable general ledger agrees to the subsidiary ledger, the vendor balance is correctly stated, and COGS has the correct amount of expense.  This same process works in reverse for corrections needed to Accounts Receivable and its subsidiary ledger.

You can use debit memos and credits memos to achieve the same result, as long as you can control where the debit/credit memos post to.  You want them to post right back to the G/L account where you are making the correction.  Some software does not permit you to make entries to accounts payable and accounts receivable in this manner, but here is how that would work, using the above example:

Open up ABC Corp and issue a credit memo to the vendor for $1,000.  Set up the credit memo to post directly to Accounts Payable.  When posted, the credit memo will both debit and credit A/P in the amount of $1,000, so it will have no effect on the A/P balance, and the sub-ledger for ABC Corp. will reflect the $1,000 credit memo, so it will now be in agreement with the general ledger.

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